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Ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
Assyria Nineveh
Arslan Tash Til Barsip
Iran Palace of Darius
Phoenicia Arabia Palmyra
Syrian coast
Ougarit Byblos




 

Urn Containing Calcified Remains

AO 5991
 
Sully room 18a showcase 1
 
  
Child sacrifice,
 
an essential part of
Phoenician worship.

 

 
Child sacrifice was an essential part of Phoenician worship. Traces of this heinous practice – popularised by Flaubert’s Salammbô A251 can be found in the colonies they founded in North Africa. This ritual of immolation by fire, in which families indentured themselves to their gods with their flesh and their blood, persisted in Carthage for six centuries. It was very common in high society in order to acquire and conserve wealth and influence.  A252
 
In the Bible, the Israelite apostates, including the Kings of Judah and Manasseh, also practised child sacrifice. - 2 Kings 16:3; 2 Chronicles 33:6.

Child sacrifice, an essential part of Phoenician worship

 

“ Even his own son he made
 
pass through the fire. ”
 
2 Kings 16:3
 
 
Even though King Josiah defiled Topheth,
“in the valley of the sons of Hinnom,
that no one might burn his son or
his daughter as an offering to Molech”,
this practice did not disappear.

- 2 Kings 23:10-13, Ezekiel 20:31.
 

Note the various weights

with the sign of Tanit

in the showcase in room 17b.

 

The steles and weights bear
the sign of Tanit,
generally composed
of a triangle with a horizontal bar
resting on it and a circle
or a disc above.

 

 The sign of Tanit , or Astarte

   

Thousands of steles were discovered
in the immense ossuary, Topheth,
close to Carthage.

 
These votive offerings were placed above
the actual remains: a terracotta urn containing calcified bones, sometimes accompanied with jewellery.
 
The steles bear the sign of Tanit,
generally composed of a triangle
with a horizontal bar resting on it and
a circle or a disc above.
 
Those offering the dedications made their vow to the dual protectors of the city: the god Baal Hamon and the goddess Tanit.
 
Tanit corresponds to the
Phoenician divinity Astarte.
 
 

 < Votive Stele AO 5244, AO 1014, AO 5226

 
 See also : Tanit - The Great Goddess of Carthage by Rohase Piercy
 
 
 
 




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